Looking for information on sugar glider cost in terms of adoption, caring for them and beyond?

Deciding to buy or adopt a sugar glider shouldn’t be taken lightly.

Owning one of these animals is an enormous responsibility and financial commitment.

Below, I’ll take you through all the costs to make sure ownership is a realistic choice for your household.

We're taking a look at sugar glider cost estimates to find out how much you'll spend on adoption, long-term care & more. Check it out!

How Much Does it Cost to Buy a Sugar Glider?

Potential sugar glider owners aren’t going to find these pets at a traditional pet store

Related: Sugar Glider Care

In most cases, gliders are often thought to be exotic pets, making them a bit harder to find. 

The easiest option would be contacting an experienced USDA-certified breeder.

A few alternative options would be trying your luck visiting a shelter or getting in touch with a sugar glider rescue. 

Both these places should have some sugar gliders, but they’re usually adults rather than joeys.

People looking for a joey will likely need to use a reputable breeder.

Most buyers tend to stick with joeys because they’re easier to handle and not set in their ways like adults.

As a result, joeys generally cost more than adults, ranging from$200 to $500 on average. 

Adults can be bought at a discount rate of about $100 to $200. But it’s important to research into the type of sugar gliders before buying one, as well. 

Rarer variations cost a lot more than a standard gray (classic) sugar glider.

For instance, the prices for an albino glider or leucistic glider can reach well above $1000. 

Considering adopting albino sugar gliders but want to know if they’re right for you? Check out our complete guide to these unique exotic pets to find out!

What Does it Cost to Care For Sugar Glider?

Of course, the initial price tag is only part of what you’ll be paying for these animals.

There are several upfront and care costs that each owner will have to cover with these animals. 

The cost of owning a sugar glider will often exceed what you initially pay for them.

After all, these pets need food, habitats, and other accessories to keep them in good condition.

Let’s dive into these additional costs to see what you can expect when taking care of a sugar glider.

These discussions will ensure you can prepare your checkbook for what lies ahead when owning one. 

Trying to decide whether a caramel sugar glider is the right pet for your family? Read on for our complete guide to this nifty little marsupial!

How Much Does a Sugar Glider Cage Cost

The first thing to understand about a sugar glider’s cage is it’s your most essential upfront cost.

You have to remember these pets are non-domesticated and filled with wild instincts. 

A sugar glider will need a large habitat (cage) that allows them to run, climb, and glide. Otherwise, they won’t get the exercise required to keep them happy. 

But choosing the right cage can be a bit difficult for first-time owners.

One general rule of thumb to remember is that these cages need to be taller than wide for climbing purposes. 

A suitable set of cage measurements would be at least 24 inches wide by 36 inches tall by 24 inches deep.

Experts consider this the minimum acceptable area for a pair of sugar gliders (most people tend to buy pairs rather than single glider). 

I’d recommend getting something a bit larger as more room is always good for these animals.

But please ensure the spacing between the bars isn’t more than a half-inch for their safety. 

Given this information, it shouldn’t be surprising to learn these cages’ price tags vary dramatically.

It’ll end up being contingent on the materials and size, but generally, you can expect to spend between $100 and $200

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Cost of Cage Accessories

Your sugar glider’s cage won’t be a suitable home without some top-tier accessories.

Owners will need to place items like water bottles, food bowls, perches, and hideaways in these habitats. 

Sugar gliders also require a warm environment. If your home gets a little chilly, buying a space heater and placing it two feet away from their cage would be a wise

It’s an essential piece of making sure your glider can thrive inside your home.

Overall, you should expect to spend about $30 to $80 on these supplies.

These additions bring your cage cost to anywhere between $130 and $230.

How Much Does it Cost to Feed a Sugar Glider?

As I mentioned earlier, sugar gliders are non-domesticated animals.

This characteristic doesn’t only affect their cage requirements but also what they can eat. 

Sugar gliders can’t process regular pet food, which means owners need to build their diets on what they eat in the wild.

These pets will require a balanced diet containing the following items:

  • Fruit
  • Vegetables
  • Nectar
  • Live insects
  • Supplements

Most owners decide to start meeting these requirements by purchasing commercial pellets.

These pellets will provide much-needed nutrients, but it’s essential to make sure they only consist of a third of their diet. 

If you let them snack on these commercial pellets, it’ll make them overweight and sluggish.

It’s the main reason why captive sugar gliders are at a high risk of obesity. 

Owners will need to compensate for other requirements by feeding them Leadbeater’s mixture daily.

You should supplement this mixture with live insects and a limited amount of vegetables/fruits. 

As for a sugar gilder’s food intake, these animals don’t eat a massive amount.

But this specialized diet isn’t cheap as owners should budget spending at least $30 a month for food

These animals are somewhat messy eaters, as well.

It’s a good idea to buy some bedding for their cage’s bottom, which should make cleaning up after them more manageable.

You might also need to replace certain toys or cage accessories and invest in cleaning supplies.

I’d suggest adding around $15 per month into your budget for these potential expenses. 

How Much Does it Cost to Take Your Sugar Glider To The Vet?

If you buy or adopt a sugar glider, it’s essential to take them for a vet visit within 48 hours.

It’s often a requirement for most breeders who offer health guarantees that expire after this amount of time. 

It’s a crucial step because your veterinarian will discuss your sugar glider’s housing, care, and diet requirements.

One overlooked benefit of these animals is they don’t require vaccinations. 

The lack of them should keep this vet visit’s cost lower than you’d expect with other animals.

I’d imagine that you’ll end up spending around $45-75, depending on the vet. 

However, this fee will be an annual one. Sugar gliders need yearly wellness checks because of their proclivity to certain conditions and diseases: 

  • Teeth problems
  • Metabolic bone disease
  • Obesity
  • Renal disease
  • Diarrhea
  • Hyperparathyroidism 

What Does it Cost to Get a Male Sugar Glider Neutered?

Neutering a male sugar glider will cost anywhere from $100 to $350, depending on your vet and location.

Many people have their breeder, or a shelter do it for a reduction in the initial price. 

However, some adult males available at shelters or rescues will already be neutered before you get them.

This benefit is another reason many potential owners decide adoption an adult’s more their speed. 

You’re probably wondering about the price of spaying female sugar gliders, as well.

Most vets consider the procedure too invasive and dangerous, which means it doesn’t cost a thing (because very few vets will do it). 

The only thing to do is not house them with a non-neutered male. 

Should I Neuter My Sugar Glider?

Most experts recommend neutering male sugar gliders for many different reasons.

One of the most important would be un-neutered males are prone to mutilating themselves in captivity

As you imagine, this situation isn’t fun for the owner or sugar gliders.

Neutering is also recommended for anyone who’s housing a male with another glider of either gender. 

It’s the only way to ensure babies sugar gliders don’t become a part of your life accidentally

Related: Sugar Glider Rescues

Related: Sugar Glider Rescues.

Plus, an un-neutered male housed with another male can demonstrate territorial behavior, leading to fights. 

What Does It Cost To Groom A Sugar Glider

Sugar glidersdon’t require bathswhen placed with other members of their species.

These animals will groom themselves, which removes a vast hassle from your plate.

Even if you have a single glider, their grooming needs won’t be something you have to think about much.

Buying nail scissors for trimming their nails is the only grooming purchase I’d recommend. These products shouldn’t cost more than $10 at maximum. 

Total Cost of Owning a Sugar Glider

We’ve now gone through all the potential upfront and cares costs of owning these animals.

It’s time to total up everything and find a rough estimate for having a small glider in your home.

Here’s a quick bulleted list to take you through what might be coming out of your wallet shortly: 

CategoryLow EndHigh End
Buying or Adopting$100$500
Habitat + Supplies$130$230
Neutering$100$350
Annual Veterinary Costs$45$75
Monthly Food and Supplies$50$75
Total Cost$425$1,230

These costs will vary on numerous factors, but this outline should provide a rough estimate.

However, I’d advise spending close to maximum on all these areas besides the buying fee and neutering costs.

You want these animals to live the best possible with high-quality cages, food, and supplies.

It’s essential to give these pets a quality of living that makes them feel happy and fulfilled. 

If you have any more questions about the cost of owning a sugar glider, feel free to let me know in our comment section. 

Ben Roberts
Ben Roberts

My name is Ben Roberts, and I absolutely love animals. So, naturally, I love writing about them too! As far as my animals, I have a Pit-bull, a Beagle-lab mix, a Chihuahua, and one old cat. Each one of them provides me with a new adventure every day. And the best part is they’re all best friends. Well, except the cat when he gets a little annoyed.

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